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When 'Lucky' was locked up

Small collection of documents is window
into Mob leader's long incarceration

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Salvatore Lucania, widely known as Charlie "Lucky" Luciano, late in 1931 became the most powerful and influential crime boss in the United States. Lucania personally commanded a sprawling Mafia organization based in New York City, held one of seven seats on the U.S. Mafia's ruling Commission and maintained valuable alliances with non-Italian racketeering organizations across the country.

Salvatore Lucania

Lucania

Less than five years after achieving gangland eminence, however, Lucania was taken into custody. Due to the efforts of Special Prosecutor Thomas Dewey, Lucania spent most of the next decade - from the prime years of his life into middle age - behind prison bars. When he finally emerged early in 1946, he was forced into permanent exile from his adopted homeland.

Lucky, who had embraced a luxurious and carefree lifestyle that included the grandest accommodations, the flashiest entertainment, the finest clothing and the most delectable cuisine, must have found most of his time in prison unbearably offensive, ordinary and dull. He had to endure the drudgery of minimally compensated labor, the cold sameness of institutional surroundings and routines, the unpleasantness of prison garb, the suffocatingly close contact with society's dregs and the daily disappointment of barely edible chow.

Largely out of touch with the rich criminal empire he assembled and remote from friends and family, he went long periods of time without hearing news of interest to him and without seeing faces of importance to him. He depended upon the pennies earned through manual toil and occasional contributions from relatives and associates to finance his many purchases through prison commissaries.

Yet, even during a lengthy prison stay, Lucania found a way to make himself important.

In the spring of 1942, Lucania convinced New York County prosecutors, New York State corrections officials and the United States Office of Naval Intelligence that he was indispensable to the U.S. war effort. Naval Intelligence hoped to use Lucania's influence to secure America's ports, deter enemy spying and sabotage and acquire data that would assist Allied military action against Axis enemies.

To facilitate his cooperation, Lucania was moved from remote Clinton Prison at Dannemora, New York, to Great Meadow Prison, in the hamlet of Comstock. More accessible from New York City, Great Meadow also happened to be just a short drive from the New York underworld's playground at Saratoga Springs.

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1936

1937

1938

1939

1940

1941

1942

1943

1944

1945

1946

Sources

State officials also agreed to suspend visitation rules and recordkeeping, allowing Lucania to keep closely and unaccountably in touch with underworld colleagues.

While Lucania's underworld connections may have helped to secure labor peace on New York City-area docks, there is little evidence of substantial contributions to the U.S. war effort. Still, the vague insistence by Naval Intelligence officer Charles Radcliffe Haffenden that Lucania had provided assistance to the Navy appears to have been a major factor in an early 1946 commutation of Lucania's sentence by then-Governor Dewey.

The sentence commutation was conditional on Lucania's permanent deportation from the U.S. Even after his parole from state prison, the crime boss remained officially in custody of Immigration and Naturalization agents until a ship sailed him beyond U.S. territorial waters.

There are few official records from Lucania's long term in state prisons. From the period before 1942, only a small collection of documents remains. These include receiving blotter pages, health and psychiatric reports, visitor logs and financial transactions that shed some light on his stays in Sing Sing Prison and Clinton Prison. From his transfer into Great Meadow Prison to his parole, even less survives. Normal prison recordkeeping relating to visitors was suspended, and other prison files were lost or discarded or surrendered to other government agencies. While Naval Intelligence records could have helped to fill in the blanks, any pertinent records appear to have been deliberately destroyed just as World War II came to a close.

Some details from the period were pieced together later, when the State of New York, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Navy, itself, took interest in the subject and conducted investigations.

Available details of Lucania's time in prison and related events have been assembled in the timeline below. These details range in excitement level from hum-drum to spectacular. Information was drawn primarily from Clinton State Prison files, the Herlands Investigation* of New York State and declassified FBI files. Quotes from documents and links to documents - including all available pages of the Clinton Prison files - are included. As additional items are located, they will be added.

[* Directed by Governor Thomas E. Dewey, William B. Herlands conducted an investigation into the circumstances relating to the commutation of sentence of Lucania and the parole granted to him for the purpose of his deportation.]

1936

1936 Mar 31
New York County Special Prosecutor Thomas E. Dewey, appointed by Governor Herbert Lehman to break up racketeering in the city, obtains an arrest warrant for Salvatore "Charlie Lucky Luciano" Lucania. The warrant, granted by Supreme Court Justice Philip J. McCook, notes that a minimum bail of $200,000 should be set when Lucania is apprehended. (Dewey)
1936 Apr 01
Lucania is arrested in Hot Springs, Arkansas, under the warrant issued in New York. At the time, he is vacationing in Hot Springs, a resident of the Hotel Arlington. He is held for one hour and then released in $5,000 bail provided by W.S. Jacobs, proprietor of the Southern Club and the Club Belvedere. Finding Hot Springs' local authorities to be cooperating with Lucania, New York County Special Prosecutor Thomas E. Dewey works with Arkansas Attorney General Carl E. Bailey to arrange the rearrest of Lucania and an increase in bail to $200,000. Twenty state troopers are dispatched to remove Lucania from Hot Springs and jail him at the state capital of Little Rock. (NYT April 19)
Lucania

Lucania (r)

1936 Apr 02
Salvatore "Charlie Lucky Luciano" Lucania and a dozen other individuals are indicted by a New York County extraordinary grand jury for engaging in compulsory prostitution. (NYT June 19)
1936 Apr 04
Lucania is arrested on charges of compulsory prostitution. (Herlands)
1936 Apr 07
An Arkansas court grants Lucania a ten-day period in which to formally appeal extradition to New York. Lucania attorneys intend to file their appeal at the last moment of that period in order to keep Lucania out of the reach of New York authorities for the longest possible time. (NYT April 8)
1936 Apr 17
Noting that the court-granted ten-day appeal period has technically expired, New York detectives, working under secret orders from Dewey, take custody of Lucania at the Little Rock, Arkansas, jail at one minute past midnight. They begin the trip back to New York City. Lucania's attorneys had planned to file an appeal of his extradition in the morning. (Dewey)
1936 Apr 18
Lucania arrives at New York's Grand Central Terminal under intense security and is taken to police headquarters and then to New York County Supreme Court. He is arraigned on compulsory prostitution charges before Justice Philip J. McCook. At arraignment, Lucania corrects police on the spelling of his name, which is often misspelled as "Luciano." (The police, courts, prisons and press continue to use the incorrect spelling despite this correction.) His legal counsel is Moses Polakoff of 475 Fifth Avenue in New York City. The state is represented by Special Prosecutor Thomas E. Dewey. Justice McCook sets bail for Lucania at $350,000. Lucania is locked up in Raymond Street Jail in Brooklyn to await trial. That location is selected because material witnesses in the case are being houses in the usual detention facility, Tombs Prison in Manhattan. (Dewey, NYT April 19)
1936 May 11
Trial begins for Lucania and a dozen co-defendants before Justice Philip J. McCook. Three defendants - Peter Balitzer, Al Weiner and David Marcus - immediately enter guilty pleas. (Dewey, NYT May 12)
1936 Jun 07
Lucania is convicted on sixty-two counts of compulsory prostitution. Eight co-defendants are also convicted. (Dewey, NYT June 8)
1936 Jun 18
A pre-sentencing report is provided to the Court of General Sessions by Chief Probation Officer Irving W. Halpern. Halpern reports that Lucania is "a shallow and parasitic individual who is considerably wrapped up in his own feelings..." The report also stated:
Probation officer report

[Lucania's] social outlook is essentially childish, in that it is dominated by recklessness and a craving for action. His only asset as a leader consists of his apparent calmness at times of stress. This characteristic, which appears to have been based on his feeling that he could escape involvement, has passed for reserve and strength. As a consequence he is accorded a degree of underworld respect.

He manifests a peasant-like faith in chance and has developed an attitude of nonchalance. His behavior patterns are essentially instinctive and primitive, his manner easy, copious and ingratiating. His freedom from conscience springs from his admitted philosophy: "I never was a crumb, and if I have to be a crumb I'd rather be dead." ...His ideals of life resolved themselves into money to spend, beautiful women to enjoy, silk underclothes and places to go in style...

During [the childhood] phase of his life the defendant was reared in an impoverished environment on the lower East Side, and at an early age he was beyond the control of his parents. His behavior patterns and social attitude during this formative period were largely conditioned by the influence of unwholesome associates, with the result that by the time he was 18 years old, he acquired a definitely criminalistic pattern of conduct. (NYT June 19)

1936 Jun 18
Lucania, thirty-eight years old, is sentenced to a minimum of thirty years and a maximum of fifty years on his conviction for compulsory prostitution. A defense motion to delay the start of his prison term for thirty days is denied. He is initially placed at Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, New York. The earliest date for expiration of his sentence is April 24, 1956. The latest date for expiration is March 28, 1986. (Clinton, Dewey, Herlands)
 

SING SING STATE PRISON

Sing Sing Prison
1936 Jun 19
Lucania is received at Sing Sing Prison as inmate no. 92168. Admission records indicate he is thirty-eight years old, height of five feet nine and a half inches, weight of 151 pounds, single, Catholic, white, with brown hair and brown eyes, educated to sixth grade and a barber by occupation. His birth is placed in Italy on November 11, 1897. His parents are said to be Anthony and Millie. His father is seventy-seven years old and in poor health. His mother is deceased. Lucania has two brothers and two sisters. He has had a history of sinus and kidney trouble and had sinus surgery in 1934. A "GC 1930" notation under "Venereal History" indicates a diagnosis of gonorrhea. A negative result on a Wasserman Test suggests that he is free of syphilis. Lucania states that he does not use tobacco or alcohol and he denies involvement with drugs. He attributes his conviction on compulsory prostitution charges to "circumstances." His nearest relation is his sister, Fanny Gallaso of East White Plains, New York. (Clinton)
1936 Jun 24
Sing Sing Prison Assistant Physician James A. Kearney writes to Warden Lewis E. Lawes about new inmate Lucania. Doctor Kearney notes that Lucania "has a history relating to the use of narcotics. His transfer to Clinton Prison is, therefore, recommended." (Clinton)
1936 Jun 30
Doctor L.E. Kienholz of Sing Sing Prison examines Lucania for a psychiatric report. (Clinton)

CLASSIFICATION CLINIC

Sing Sing Prison Pyschiatic Report

Date Examined 6/30/36 by Dr. L.E. Kienholz

Number 92168

Name Charles Luciano

The following information was obtained from the probation report and the inmate.

SOCIAL HISTORY: Inmate is a white male 38 years of age born at Palmero, Italy of Italian parents, third in a fraternity of five. He is serving a sentence fo 30-0-0/50-0-0 years for Violation Section 2460 of the Penal Law - verdict. His father was a laborer in a brass factory but he is retired at present and lives with his daughter in WHite Plains, N.Y. He is a moderate alcoholic. Inmate's mother died of heart trouble last year. After inmate served his sentence in the New York County Penitentiary he left home to live in high class hotels and apartments as he stated he liked luxury. His family history is evidently essentially negative for chronic diseases. States he attended Public School up to 14 years of age when he reached the fifth grade. He was retarded in his school work and placed in a truant school because of his behavior. He worked in a doll factory stuffing dolls and as a shipping clerk. He also worked in a fish market, with his father in brass factory, dress presser, bootlegging and operating gambling dens. States he earned $5.00 a day at this work but admits his annual income was about $25000. a year although probation report states it was $1,000,000. a month. He admits gonorrhea seven times since 1914. He has had seven or eight operations on his sinus. Claims he has kidney trouble at this time. He is a drug addict. His blood Wasserman is negative. He admits living common-law relations for six years but states he couldn't get along with the girl. There was no issue. He has had 25 previous arrests most of these have been traffic violations, public welfare, and pugnacious types of offenses. Nine of these were fines and one penitentiary sentence. He is here for placing women in houses of prostitution in violation of Section 2460 of the Penal Law. There are six others involved in this case and inmate is reputed to be the leader.

DIAGNOSTIC SUMMARY: He exhibits no psychosis at this time. He is of borderline average intelligence. His progress in school was poor. He showed delinquent tendencies at this time and was sent to truant school because of it. He uses drugs and admits gonorrhea on seven occasions. He complains of kidney and sinus trouble at present. He admits he did not like to work so never held a job for any length of time but made his money at gambling so he claims. He has no trade. He claims to be a barber but admits he cannot cut hair but gave that so he might do that type of work in prison. He is the product of poor environment and heredity, received little supervision as a child. He has been a chronic offender since childhood. He admits trafficking in drugs, women, gambling or wherever he could make some easy money. He is reputed to have been with Al Capone at one time. Other than gambling and sexual promiscuousness his habits have been temperate. He has lived a nomadic type of existence following the races, resorts and gatherings where he might make his money quickly. He admits to his previous arrests and not all are listed. He was able to free himself from most of these charges and because of this was nicknamed "lucky." He claims his innocence in this case.

Respectfully submitted,
Leon E. Kienholz M.D.
Asst. Psychiatrist
Classification Clinic

 

CLINTON STATE PRISON

Clinton Prison
1936 Jul 02
Lucania is transferred from Sing Sing Prison to Clinton Prison at Dannemora, New York. Upon arrival, Lucania, inmate no. 24808, is described as single, Catholic, white, with black hair, brown eyes, educated to sixth grade and a barber by occupation. His birthdate is reported as November 11, 1897, in Italy. He is said to have lived in the United States for 32 years. Parents are noted as Anthony and Lilly Caffareli Lucania. Father is still living. It is stated that he maintains his innocence of the compulsory prostitution offense and that he was sentenced to serve six months in 1916 for selling narcotics. (Herlands)

Clinton Prison Classification Clinic

Psychiatric Report

CHARLES LUCANIA, #24808 White

Born - Italy, 11-11-97

FAMILY HISTORY: The father was born in Italy about 1869, living and in good health; a laborer by occupation and temperate in the use of alcohol. The mother was born in Italy about 1874 and died in 1936 from "heart trouble." She had 5 children, all of them are living and in good health. Inmate states the family history is negative for criminality or insanity.

PERSONAL HISTORY: Inmate is 3rd in sequence of 5 children; reared in New York City and claims to have made a good adjustment to parents and siblings He is single, had first hetero-sexual experience at age 14 and admits gonorrhea. Inmate states he used alcoholic beverages very moderately. He denies the use of narcotic drugs.

ACADEMIC HISTORY: Inmate began school at age of 7 and left at age 14 when in the 6th grade to go to work. He admits truancy and states that he was sent to the Reform School for truancy and Juvenile Delinquency.

INDUSTRIAL HISTORY: Inmate states that he has never held a job, but that he has always been in some business such as labor unions and operating restaurants and night clubs. He gives his occupation as a "book maker" and has achieved financial success at this; his earnings have been reported to be above $100,000 a year. Inmate gives his occupation at time of arrest as "book maker." he has never been in any military organization.

PRESENT OFFENSE: Inmate was arrested for violation of Section 2460 P.L. (Compulsory Prostitution). He states there were 13 other men arrested and charged with being in his employ in the operating of houses of prostitution; he states he does not know any of the other men tried with him, with the exception of one, Betillo. Inmate and other defendants were convicted of the above charge, inmate receiving a sentence in prison of 30-0/50-0 years; Betillo receiving 23-0/40-0 years in prison and the other defendants receiving sentences ranging from 7-6/15-0 to 23-0 years in prison. Inmate maintains he is innocent of the above charges, stating, "I have been in rackets, but not in that one."

1936 Jul 08
Lucania is visited by brother Bert Lucania of 314 Avenue P in Brooklyn. A visit by brother-in-law Michael Galasso of Woodside Avenue in White Plains, New York, is not permitted as Galasso has no identification. (Clinton)
1936 Jul 10
$184.40 is transferred from Lucania's cash account at Sing Sing Prison into his cash account at Clinton Prison. (Clinton)
1936 Jul 20
Prison visit by brothers Bert Lucania, 314 Avenue P, Brooklyn, and Joseph Lucania, 1638 East 24th Street, Brooklyn. (Clinton)
George Morton Levy

Levy

1936 Jul 23
Attorney George Morton Levy of Freeport, Long Island, visits with Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Jul 23
Lucania receives $100 for his cash account from brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Jul
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of July total $0.74. (Clinton)
1936 Jul
During the month of July, Lucania spends $20 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1936 Aug 04
Prison visit by Lucania friend Sidney Brown of 822 Eighth Avenue, Manhattan. (Clinton)
1936 Aug 07
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Aug 10
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Aug 11
Attorney James M. Noonan of Albany visits with Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Aug 11
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Aug 20
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Aug 24
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Aug 28
Attorney Moses Polakoff of New York City visits with Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Aug 31
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Aug
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of August total $1.30. (Clinton)
1936 Aug
During the month of August, Lucania spends $36.24 from his cash account. A total of $21.21 is spend at commissary, and $15.03 is spent on an order from Sears & Roebuck. (Clinton)
1936 Sep 09
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Sep 15
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Sep 28
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Sep
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of September total $1.25. (Clinton)
1936 Sep
During the month of September, Lucania spends $17.65 from his cash account. A total of $14.65 is spent at commissary, and $3 is spent on postage stamps. (Clinton)
1936 Oct 09
Prison visit by sister Fannie Galasso of East White Plains, New York; brother Joseph Lucania and brother Bert Lucania. Nephew Anthony Lucania was not permitted to visit as he refused to be fingerprinted. (Clinton)
Lucania

Charlie Lucky

1936 Oct 19
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Oct 27
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Oct
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of October total $1.30. (Clinton)
1936 Oct
During the month of October, Lucania spends $34.54 from his cash account. A total of $31.13 is spent at commissary, and $3.41 is spent on milk. (Clinton)
1936 Nov 13
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Nov 23
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Nov
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of November total $1.10. (Clinton)
1936 Nov
During the month of November, Lucania spends $33.91 from his cash account. A total of $30.61 is spent at commissary, and $3.30 is spent on milk. (Clinton)
1936 Dec 07
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Dec 22
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Dec
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of December total $1.30. (Clinton)
1936 Dec
During the month of December, Lucania spends $13.93 from his cash account. A total of $10.52 is spent at commissary, and $3.41 is spent on milk. Since his arrival at Clinton Prison, Lucania has spent 156.27 from his cash account, roughly equivalent to $2,750 in current dollars. (Clinton, BLS Inflation Calculator)

1937

1937 Jan 08
Lucania receives $100 for his cash account. (Clinton)
1937 Jan 11
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Jan 25
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Jan
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of January total $1.25. (Clinton)
1937 Jan
During the month of January, Lucania spends $17.09 from his cash account. A total of $13.68 is spent at commissary, and $3.41 is spent on milk. (Clinton)
1937 Feb 01
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Feb 23
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Feb
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of February total $1.10. (Clinton)
1937 Feb
During the month of February, Lucania spends $35.74 from his cash account. A total of $32.66 is spent at commissary, and $3.08 is spent on milk. (Clinton)
1937 Mar 08
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Mar 15
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Mar 30
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1936 Mar
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of March total $1.35. (Clinton)
1937 Mar
During the month of March, Lucania spends $18.79 from his cash account. A total of $15.69 is spent at commissary, and $3.10 is spent on milk. (Clinton)
1937 Apr 13
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Apr 28
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Apr
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of April total $1.30. (Clinton)
1937 Apr
During the month of April, Lucania spends $15.89 from his cash account. A total of $12.89 is spent at commissary, and $3.00 is spent on milk. (Clinton)
Brooklyn Eagle
1937 May 07
Some witnesses against Lucania have recanted their testimonies, but New York Supreme Court rules against Lucania's request for a new trial. (Appeal 1937)
1937 May 12
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 May 29
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 May
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of May total $1.25. (Clinton)
1937 May
During the month of May, Lucania spends $28.97 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1937 Jun 07
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Jun 10
Prison visit by attorney Daniel Segal of New York City. (Clinton)
1937 Jun 24
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Jun
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of June total $1.30. (Clinton)
1937 Jun
During the month of June, Lucania spends $15.24 from his cash account. A total of $12.14 is spent at commissary, and $3.10 is spent on milk. (Clinton)
1937 Jul 12
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Jul 15
Prison visit by Lucania friend Mrs. McLaughlin of Albert Pike Hotel, Little Rock, Arkansas. (Clinton)
1937 Jul 20
Prison visit by attorney David Paley of New York City. (Clinton)
1937 Jul 21
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Jul 29
Prison visit by attorney David Paley of New York City. (Clinton)
1937 Jul
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of July total $1.30. (Clinton)
1937 Jul
During the month of July, Lucania spends $6.65 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1937 Aug 02
Prison visit by brother Joseph Lucania and sister Fanny Galasso. (Clinton)
1937 Aug 09
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Aug 16
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania and niece Tilly Lucania, 1628 East 24th Street, Brooklyn. (Clinton)
1937 Aug 19
Prison visit by attorney Moses Polakoff of New York City. (Clinton)
1937 Aug 30
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. Visit by attorney David Paley of New York City. (Clinton)
1937 Aug
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of August total $1.30. (Clinton)
1937 Aug
During the month of August, Lucania spends $23.38 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1937 Sep 13
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Sep 22
Second cousin Fred Brown, 44 Second Street, Troy, New York, is not permitted to visit because he refuses to be fingerprinted. (Clinton)
1937 Sep 27
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Sep
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of September total $1.25. (Clinton)
1937 Sep
During the month of September, Lucania spends $18.60 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1937 Oct 11
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Oct 21
Prison visit by cousin Alfred DeComo of 921 Second Avenue, New York City, and cousin Alfred Mafred, 402 Second Avenue, New York City. (Clinton)
1937 Oct 25
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Oct
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of October total $1.25. (Clinton)
1937 Oct
During the month of October, Lucania spends $13.27 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1937 Nov 08
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Nov 29
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Nov
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of November total $1.15. (Clinton)
1937 Nov
During the month of November, Lucania spends $15.65 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1937 Dec 14
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Dec 16
Lucania receives $60 for his cash account from brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Dec 28
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1937 Dec
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of December total $1.30. (Clinton)
1937 Dec
During the month of December, Lucania spends $13.66 from his cash account. A total of $10.66 is spent at commissary, and $3.00 is spent on milk. Since the beginning of the year, Lucania has spent $222.93 from his cash account, roughly equivalent to $3,820 in current dollars. A total of $204.24 has been spent at commissary, and $18.69 has been spent on milk. (Clinton, BLS Inflation Calculator)

1938

1938 Jan 11
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 Jan
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of January total $1.25. (Clinton)
1938 Jan
During the month of January, Lucania spends $18.88 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1938 Feb 02
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 Feb 12
Prison visit by Fred Jordon, of the District Attorney's Office in New York City. The visit lasts for seventy-five minutes in the presence of Warden Murphy. (Clinton)
1938 Feb 15
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 Feb
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of February total $1.10. (Clinton)
1938 Feb
During the month of February, Lucania spends $10.90 from his cash account. A total of $8.40 is spent at commissary, and $2.50 is spent on glasses. (Clinton)
1938 Mar 22
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 Mar
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of March total $1.35. (Clinton)
1938 Mar
During the month of March, Lucania spends $7.47 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
Binghamton Press
1938 Apr 12
New York Court of Appeals affirms the sentences imposed on Lucania and vice trial co-defendants. Attorneys for Lucania and his co-defendants attempt to appeal to the United States Supreme Court, but the petition for writ of certiorari is denied. (Appeal 1938)
1938 Apr 19
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 Apr
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of April total $1.30. (Clinton)
1938 Apr
During the month of April, Lucania spends $9.86 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1938 May 24
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 May
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of May total $1.25. $1 from his compensation account is spent at commissary. (Clinton)
1938 May
During the month of May, Lucania spends $9.62 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1938 Jun 06
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania and sister Fanny Galasso. (Clinton)
1938 Jun 11
Lucania receives $50 for his cash account from brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 Jun 18
Prison visit by brother Joseph Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 Jun
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of June total $1.30. (Clinton)
1938 Jun
During the month of June, Lucania spends $7.96 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1938 Jul 11
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 Jul
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of July total $1.25. (Clinton)
1938 Jul
During the month of July, Lucania spends $19.65 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1938 Aug 01
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 Aug 19
Defense attorney Moses Polakoff of New York City visits. (Clinton)
1938 Aug 23
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 Aug
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of August total $1.35. (Clinton)
1938 Aug
During the month of August, Lucania spends $12.52 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1938 Sep 19
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 Sep
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of September total $1.25. (Clinton)
1938 Sep
During the month of September, Lucania spends $13.26 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
Leo Katcher

Katcher

1938 Oct 03
Friend Leo Katcher of 75 West Street in New York City, journalist with New York Post, visits along with friend Maurice F. Canter of 342 Madison Avenue in New York City. (Clinton)
1938 Oct 10
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 Oct 11
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1938 Oct 15
Lucania receives $50 for his cash account. (Clinton)
1938 Oct
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of October total $1.25. $0.10 from his compensation account is donated to church. (Clinton)
1938 Oct
During the month of October, Lucania spends $1.93 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1938 Nov 11
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. Visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1938 Nov 22
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 Nov 26
Lucania receives $50 for his cash account from brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1938 Nov
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of November total $1.15. (Clinton)
1938 Nov
During the month of November, Lucania spends $13.12 from his cash account. A total of $9.97 is spent at commissary, and $3.15 is spent on glasses. (Clinton)
1938 Dec 20
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1938 Dec 24
Lucania receives $75 for his cash account from attorney Michael Conti. (Clinton)
1938 Dec
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of December total $1.32. (Clinton)
1938 Dec
During the month of December, Lucania spends $12.39 from his cash account at commissary. Since the beginning of the year, Lucania has spent $137.56 from his cash account, roughly equivalent to $2,420 in current dollars. A total of $131.91 has been spent at commissary, and $5.65 has been spent on glasses. (Clinton, BLS Inflation Calculator)

1939

1939 Jan 01
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1939 Jan 30
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1939 Jan
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of January total $1.27. (Clinton)
1939 Jan
During the month of January, Lucania spends $8.00 from his cash account. A total of $6.14 is spent at commissary, and $1.86 is spent on milk. (Clinton)
1939 Feb 19
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. Visit by attorney Nicholas P. Ianuzzi of New York City. (Clinton)
John Lyons

Lyons

1939 Feb 28
New York Governor Herbert Lehman appoints John A. Lyons to the position of Commissioner of Corrections. (Herlands)
1939 Feb
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of February total $1.10. (Clinton)
1939 Feb
During the month of February, Lucania spends $9.53 from his cash account. A total of $7.67 is spent at commissary, and $1.86 is spent on milk. (Clinton)
1939 Mar 04
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1939 Mar 15
Lucania receives $75 for his cash account from attorney Michael Conti. (Clinton)
1939 Mar
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of March total $1.35. $8.04 from his compensation account is spent at commissary. (Clinton)
1939 Mar
During the month of March, Lucania spends $7.39 from his cash account. A total of $4.46 is spent at commissary, $1.68 is spent on milk, and $1.25 is spent on glasses. (Clinton)
1939 Apr 07
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1939 Apr 13
Lucania receives $100 for his cash account from attorney Michael Conti. (Clinton)
1939 Apr 24
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1939 Apr
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of April total $1.25. $8.04 from his compensation account is spent at commissary. (Clinton)
1939 Apr
During the month of April, Lucania makes no withdrawal from his cash account. (Clinton)
1939 May 05
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1939 May 11
Lucania receives $100 for his cash account from an attorney. (Clinton)
1939 May 22
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1939 May 29
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1939 May
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of May total $1.30. (Clinton)
1939 May
During the month of May, Lucania spends $8.22 from his cash account. A total of $6.36 is spent at commissary, and $1.86 is spent on milk. (Clinton)
1939 Jun 14
Prison visit by H.B. Dill of the Buffalo office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. (Clinton)
1939 Jun 27
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1939 Jun 30
Lucania receives $100 for his cash account from attorney Michael Conti. (Clinton)
1939 Jun
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of June total $1.30. (Clinton)
1939 Jun
During the month of June, Lucania spends $35.43 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1939 Jul 17
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
Moses Polakoff

Polakoff"

1939 Jul 17
Defense attorney Moses Polakoff visits. Polakoff believes his involvement in the Lucania case is concluded, and he does not visit again for several years. (Herlands)
1939 Jul
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of July total $1.25. (Clinton)
1939 Jul
During the month of July, Lucania makes no withdrawal from his cash account. (Clinton)
1939 Aug 14
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania and sister Fanny Galasso. (Clinton)
1939 Aug 17
Prison visit by attorneys Moses Polakoff and Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1939 Aug 22
Lucania receives $75 for his cash account from attorney Michael Conti. (Clinton)
Justice Philip McCook

McCook

1939 Aug 24
New York Supreme Court Justice Philip J. McCook, who sentenced Lucania three years earlier, visits Lucania at prison. (Clinton)
1939 Aug 30
Prison visit by brother Joseph Lucania and nephew Anthony Lucania. (Clinton)
1939 Aug
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of August total $1.35. (Clinton)
1939 Aug
During the month of August, Lucania spends $37.60 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1939 Sep 11
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1939 Sep 29
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1939 Sep
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of September total $1.25. (Clinton)
1939 Sep
During the month of September, Lucania spends $23.95 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1939 Oct 03
Lucania receives $75 for his cash account from an attorney. (Clinton)
1939 Oct 23
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1939 Oct
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of October total $1.25. (Clinton)
1939 Oct
During the month of October, Lucania spends $23.63 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1939 Nov 29
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1939 Nov
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of November total $1.15. $6.70 from his compensation account is spent at commissary. (Clinton)
1939 Nov
During the month of November, Lucania spends $12.20 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1939 Dec 08
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1939 Dec 08
Lucania receives $75 for his cash account from an attorney. (Clinton)
1939 Dec 18
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1939 Dec
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of December total $1.25. (Clinton)
1939 Dec
During the month of December, Lucania spends $24.80 from his cash account. A total of $22.94 is spent at commissary, and $1.86 is spent on milk. Since the beginning of the year, Lucania has spent $190.75 from his cash account, roughly equivalent to $3,360 in current dollars. A total of $181.63 has been spent at commissary, and $9.12 has been spent on milk. (Clinton, BLS Inflation Calculator)

1940

1940 Jan
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of January total $1.30. (Clinton)
1940 Jan
During the month of December, Lucania spends $22.90 from his cash account. A total of $21,04 is spent at commissary, and $1.86 is spent on milk. (Clinton)
1940 Feb 06
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1940 Feb
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of February total $1.15.(Clinton)
1940 Feb
During the month of February, Lucania spends $18.22 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1940 Mar
During the month of March, Lucania spends $19.75 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1940 Mar
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of March total $1.30. (Clinton)
1940 Apr 01
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1940 Apr 03
Lucania receives $100 for his cash account from attorney Michael Conti. (Clinton)
1940 Apr 18
United States Census of 1940 shows "Charles Luciano" as inmate 24806, in Clinton Prison at Dannemora, New York. He is listed as 42 years old, single, born in Italy, educated through sixth grade. (US Census 1940)
1940 Apr
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of April total $1.30. (Clinton)
1940 Apr
During the month of April, Lucania spends $21.21 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1940 May 13
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania and sister Fanny Galasso. (Clinton)
1940 May
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of May total $1.30. (Clinton)
1940 May
During the month of May, Lucania spends $17.93 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1940 Jun 26
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1940 Jun 29
Lucania receives $100 for his cash account. (Clinton)
1940 Jun
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of June total $1.25. $0.99 from his compensation account is spent at commissary. (Clinton)
1940 Jun
During the month of June, Lucania spends $2.50 from his cash account on an outgoing order. (Clinton)
1940 Jul 15
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1940 Jul
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of July total $1.30. (Clinton)
1940 Jul
During the month of July, Lucania spends $21.18 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1940 Aug 16
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1940 Aug 27
E.D. Fitzpatrick of the New York City Police Department visits Lucania in prison. (Clinton)
1940 Aug 31
Prison visit by sister Fanny Galasso. (Clinton)
1940 Aug
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of August total $1.35. (Clinton)
1940 Aug
During the month of August, Lucania spends $44.46 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1940 Sep 16
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania and brother Joseph Lucania. (Clinton)
1940 Sep
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of September total $1.20. $2.00 from his compensation account is spent at commissary. (Clinton)
1940 Sep
During the month of September, Lucania makes no withdrawal from his cash account. (Clinton)
1940 Oct 17
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1940 Oct
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of October total $1.30. (Clinton)
1940 Oct
During the month of October, Lucania spends $44.64 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1940 Nov 26
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1940 Nov
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of November total $1.15. (Clinton)
1940 Nov
During the month of November, Lucania makes no withdrawal from his cash account. (Clinton)
1940 Dec 17
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1940 Dec
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of Deember total $1.30. (Clinton)
1940 Dec
During the month of December, Lucania spends $24.52 from his cash account. A total of $22.72 is spent at commissary, and $1.80 is spent on milk. Since the beginning of the year, Lucania has spent $237.31 from his cash account, roughly equivalent to $4,150 in current dollars. A total of $231.15 has been spent at commissary, $3.66 has been spent on milk, and $2.50 has been spent on an outgoing order. (Clinton, BLS Inflation Calculator)

1941

1941 Jan 27
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1941 Jan
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of January total $1.30. (Clinton)
1941 Jan
During the month of January, Lucania spends $18.39 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1941 Feb 18
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1941 Feb
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of February total $1.20. (Clinton)
1941 Feb
During the month of February, Lucania spends $20.37 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1941 Mar 07
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1941 Mar
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of March total $1.40. (Clinton)
1941 Mar
During the month of March, Lucania spends $21.22 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1941 Apr
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of April total $1.35. (Clinton)
1941 Apr
During the month of April, Lucania spends $21.25 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1941 May
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of May total $1.30. (Clinton)
1941 May
During the month of May, Lucania spends $22.86 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1941 Jun 18
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1941 Jun 23
Lucania receives $100 for his cash account from an attorney. (Clinton)
1941 Jun
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of June total $1.25. (Clinton)
1941 Jun
During the month of June, Lucania makes no withdrawal from his cash account. (Clinton)
1941 Jul 18
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1941 Jul
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of July total $1.30. $1.21 from his compensation account is spent at commissary. (Clinton)
1941 Jul
During the month of July, Lucania spends $40.70 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1941 Aug 18
Prison visit by brother Joseph Lucania. (Clinton)
1941 Aug 21
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1941 Aug
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of August total $1.30. $1.00 from his compensation account is spent at commissary. (Clinton)
1941 Aug
During the month of August, Lucania spends $22.98 from his cash account on an outgoing order. (Clinton)
1941 Sep
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of September total $1.25. $2.13 from his compensation account is spent at commissary. (Clinton)
1941 Sep
During the month of September, Lucania spends $22.78 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1941 Oct 08
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1941 Oct
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of October total $1.30. (Clinton)
1941 Oct
During the month of October, Lucania makes no withdrawal from his cash account. (Clinton)
1941 Nov 06
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1941 Nov
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of November total $1.25. $1.00 from his compensation account is spent at commissary. (Clinton)
1941 Nov
During the month of November, Lucania spends $21.60 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1941 Dec 12
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1941 Dec 22
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (Clinton)
1941 Dec
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of December total $1.30. (Clinton)
1941 Dec
During the month of December, Lucania spends $48.81 from his cash account. A total of $45.15 is spent at commissary, and $3.66 is spent on milk. Since the start of the year, Lucania has spent $260.76 from his cash account, roughly equivalent to $4,150 in current dollars. A total of $234.12 has been spent at commissary, $22.98 has been sent on an outgoing order, and $3.66 has been spent on milk. (Clinton, BLS Inflation Calculator)

1942

1942
Frederick A. Moran, member of the state Board of Parole since 1938, is elected as chairman of the board. (Herlands)
1942 Jan 01
Frank S. Hogan takes office as district attorney for the County of New York. (Herlands)
1942 Jan 14
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1942 Jan
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of January total $1.30. $1.92 from his compensation account is spent at commissary. (Clinton)
1942 Jan
During the month of January, Lucania spends $32.41 from his cash account. A total of $20.55 is spent at commissary, and $1.86 is spent on milk. A $10 donation is made to the Red Cross. (Clinton)
1942 Feb 02
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
1942 Feb 09
During conversion of the French liner Normandie into a U.S. military transport (to be christened Lafayette), the ship is destroyed by fire at a New York North River pier. Sabotage is feared. (Herlands)
Normandie

The Normandie rests on her side
in the Hudson River after a devastating fire.
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

1942 Feb
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of February total $1.20. (Clinton)
1942 Feb
During the month of February, Lucania spends $31.02 from his cash account. A total of $29.16 is spent at commissary, and $1.86 is spent on milk. (Clinton)
1942 Mar
Captain Roscoe C. MacFall and other authorities from the Office of Naval Intelligence hope to acquire underworld assistance in securing important U.S. harbors. They seek the aid of New York County District Attorney Frank S. Hogan. (Herlands)
1942 Mar 07
Captain Roscoe C. MacFall and his assistant, Lieutenant O'Malley, confer at the New York County District Attorney's Office with D.A. Frank S. Hogan and with Murray I. Gurfein, assistant district attorney in charge of the Rackets Bureau. Following the meeting, Captain MacFall designates Commander Charles Radcliffe Haffenden to serve as ONI representative in further dealings with the District Attorney's Office. Haffenden is in charge of B-3 Section, investigating enemy spies and sabotage. (Herlands)
Murray Gurfein

Gurfein

1942 Mar 25
Commander Haffenden, accompanied by Lieutenant James O'Malley Jr., confers at the District Attorney's Office with Frank Hogan and Murray Gurfein about a plan to work with underworld figures to secure U.S. harbors. Hogan authorizes Gurfein to cooperate with Haffenden on the plan. ONI officials establish contact with attorney Joseph K. Guerin, who represents Joseph "Socks" Lanza, Lucania-linked waterfront racketeer. Lanza is under indictment for conspiracy and extortion. (Herlands)
1942 Mar 26 day
Assistant District Attorney Murray Gurfein meets for twenty minutes with Joseph Lanza defense attorney Joseph Guerin at the office of the New York County District Attorney. Following the meeting, Guerin calls his client Lanza to his office and explains the situation. (Herlands)
1942 Mar 26 evening
Joseph "Socks" Lanza, defense attorney Joseph Guerin and Assistant District Attorney Murray Gurfein meet at eleven-thirty in the evening at Broadway and 103rd Street. They take a taxi to 135th Street and Riverside Park and discuss the project for about one hour on a park bench. (Herlands)
1942 Mar
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of March total $1.50. $4.73 from his compensation account is spent at commissary. (Clinton)
1942 Mar
During the month of March, Lucania spends $22.21 from his cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
1942 Apr
Early in April, Joseph Lanza meets with Commander Haffenden at Haffenden's private Hotel Astor office. The meeting, which lasts about thirty-five minutes, is attended by defense attorney Joseph Guerin and briefly by Assistant District Attorney Murray Gurfein. It is the only meeting between Lanza and Haffenden that involves Guerin. (Herlands)
1942 Apr
Several days after their first meeting, Lanza again meets with Haffenden. Haffenden initiated the meeting by telephone call. It is held at ONI offices on Church Street. Subsequent meetings are held about every week. (Herlands)
1942 Apr 09
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti of New York City. (Clinton)
Joseph Lanza

Lanza

1942 Apr 16
Lanza suggests to defense attorney Joseph Guerin that ONI would benefit from bringing the influential Lucania into the project. Guerin instructs Lanza to report that to Commander Haffenden. Lanza does so before the end of April. (Herlands)
1942 Apr
Haffenden works with Assistant District Attorney Murray Gurfein to establish contact with Lucania through defense attorney Moses Polakoff. Polakoff has not spoken with Lucania since his last visit to Dannemora in August 1939. (Herlands)
1942 Apr
Defense attorney Moses Polakoff brings underworld figure Meyer Lansky, a close associate of Lucania, into the discussions. Polakoff claims he does not know Lucania well enough to discuss the ONI project with him and argues that Lansky would be an effective intermediary with Lucania. (Herlands)
1942 Apr
Moses Polakoff, Murray Gurfein and Meyer Lansky meet for breakfast at Longchamps Restaurant, 58th Street. Lansky agrees to assist in the project but dislikes the idea of having to travel between New York City and Dannemora. Polakoff also objects to traveling the great distance. Gurfein says he will try to fix the problem. Following the restaurant discussion, Gurfein takes Polakoff and Lansky to the Astor Hotel and introduces them to Commander Haffenden. (Herlands)
1942 Apr
Commander Haffenden submits written request, through Lieutenant Commander Lawrence Cowen of Naval intelligence in the Albany area, to New York State Corrections Commissioner John A. Lyons for the transfer of Lucania from the remote Clinton Prison at Dannemora to a more accessible facility. After Lyons reads the letter, Cowen takes back the document and destroys it, as Haffenden had instructed. (Herlands).
1942 Apr 29
Murray Gurfein meets with Commissioner John A. Lyons at the corrections offices in Albany on the matter of Lucania's prison transfer. Gurfein had been a New York County assistant district attorney. With U.S. entry into World War II, he joined the Army and became involved in the Office of Strategic Services. (Herlands)
1942 Apr
Lucania's earnings in prison for the month of April total $1.30. (Clinton)
1942 Apr
During the month of April, Lucania spends $45.27 from his cash account. A total of $23.41 is spent at commissary, and $1.86 is spent on milk. A $20 donation is made to a church. (Clinton)
1942 May 05
Prison visit by attorney Michael Conti. (Clinton)
1942 May 06
Corrections Commissioner John A. Lyons orders that Lucania be transferred from Clinton Prison to Great Meadow Prison. He issues that order in the presence of administrative assistant Harry L. Bonesteel and a representative of Naval Intelligence. (Herlands)
1942 May
Before the Lucania transfer is completed, Corrections Commissioner Lyons calls Great Meadow Prison Warden Vernon A. Morhous to the State Corrections Office in Albany. They discuss the move of Lucania and the ONI project. Lyons tells the warden that he will be advised in advance of ONI-related visits, that each visit will be conducted in the presence of Poladkoff, that the usual fingerprint requirement for visitors should be waived and that visitors should be permitted to speak with Lucania in private. Lyons asks that Morhous not record the visits on the usual records but provide him with a separate memo on the date and length of the visits and the persons involved. (Herlands)
 

GREAT MEADOW STATE PRISON

Great Meadow Prison
1942 May 12
Lucania is transferred from Clinton Prison at Dannemora to Great Meadow Prison in the hamlet of Comstock, about 35 miles northeast of Saratoga Springs. Great Meadow is a maximum security institution, in the same category as Clinton Prison, Sing Sing Prison and Auburn Prison. To provide cover for the Luciano transfer, a number of other inmates are transferred between the two prisons at the same time. (Herlands)
1942 May 15
Corrections Commissioner John A. Lyons writes to Great Meadow Prison Warden Vernon A. Morhous, advising him of the first visit of attorney Moses Polakoff of Fifth Avenue in New York City and Meyer Lansky of 525 West Forty-third Street in New York City. (Herlands)
1942 May
Visit 1. According to the Herlands report, Lucania is visited a total of twenty times in connection with the Naval Intelligence program. The FBI counts twenty-two such visits, with two occurring after the conclusion of the war. The first visit to Lucania occurs between mid-May and early June 1942 and includes Moses Polakoff and Meyer Lansky. Lucania agrees to assist the ONI project and asks to see Joseph "Socks" Lanza. Meyer Lansky meets frequently with Haffenden in the months to come and serves as messenger between Haffenden and Lucania. Lansky also introduced Haffenden to West Side waterfront racketeer John "Cockeye" Dunn and Mafioso Giuseppe "Joe Adonis" Doto. Documentation shows eleven visits by Lansky to Lucania in Great Meadow Prison, but evidence suggests there were additional undocumented visits. (Herlands, FBI May 1946)
1942 May
Lucania's earnings in Clinton Prison for the month of May total $0.55. $2.60 from his compensation account is spent at commissary. The balance of $47.37 in his compensation account is transferred from Clinton Prison to Great Meadow Prison. (Clinton)
1942 May
During the month of May, Lucania spends $23.83 from his Clinton Prison cash account at commissary. (Clinton)
Frank Costello

Costello

1942 Jun 04/08
Visit 2. Includes Meyer Lansky, Joseph "Socks" Lanza, Moses Polakoff. Lanza later reports that discussion focused on securing the cooperation of West Side racketeer John "Cockeye" Dunn and the Albert Anastasia-linked International Longshoremen's Association Vice President Emil Camarda. Word is sent through Frank Costello and Joe Adonis, and racketeers and union organizers fall in line. FBI report of May 1946 places this visit on June 8. Though Lanza, who controls unions at New York City's Fulton Fish Market, visits Lucania at prison multiple times after June 1942, his name does not appear in available documentation, indicating Lanza is one of the unnamed visitors noted in the records. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1942 Jun 15
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania and sister Fanny Galasso. (FBI July 1946)
1942 Jun 27
FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover announces that eight German saboteurs, landed from enemy submarines, have been arrested in New York City and Chicago. The prisoners were found in possession of $170,000 in cash, explosives and plans for destruction of defense industry plants, railways, waterworks and bridges in the East and Midwest U.S. (Herlands)
1942 Jun
During the month of June, a total of $194.03 is transferred from Lucania's cash account at Clinton Prison to Great Meadow Prison. (Clinton)
1942 Jul 17
Visit 3. Includes Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky and a third individual. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1942 Jul
During the month of July, Lucania spends $15.05 from his cash account on an outgoing order. (Clinton)
1942 Aug 25
Visit 4. Includes Frank Costello. Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky and several unnamed individuals. Records show a total of seven visitors. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1942 Sep 03
Prison visit by sister Fanny Galasso. (FBI July 1946)
1942 Sep 28
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (FBI July 1946)
1942 Oct 21
Visit 5. Includes Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky and one or two additional unnamed visitors. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1942 Nov 23
New York County district attorney begins eavesdropping on telephone communications involving headquarters of Joseph Lanza at Meyer's Hotel, Fulton Fish Market, 117 South Street in Manhattan. The wiretap is authorized by John A. Mullen, judge of the Court of General Sessions. The intercepted calls include contacts relating to Lucania's involvement in the Naval Intelligence project and are later offered as proof that underworld figures were engaged in Naval Intelligence business. (Herlands)
Fulton Fish Market

Fulton Fish Market

1942 Nov 24
New York County district attorney intercepts telephone conversation between Joseph Lanza and Commander Haffenden regarding political subversives in Harlem. (Herlands)
1942 Nov 25
New York County district attorney intercepts telephone conversation between Joseph Lanza and Commander Haffenden regarding labor peace in Brooklyn. (Herlands)
1942 Nov 26
New York County district attorney intercepts a follow-up telephone conversation between Lanza and Haffenden on the Harlem matter. (Herlands)
1942 Nov 30
New York County district attorney intercepts a telephone conversation between Commander Joseph Kaitz and Commander Haffenden. Kaitz was phoning from Lanza's office at Meyer's Hotel following a visit with Lanza. (Herlands)
1942 Dec 07
New York County district attorney intercepts a telephone conversation between Joseph Lanza and Commander Haffenden regarding information Haffenden sought from a contact in Brooklyn. On the same date, Lanza converses with Willie McCabe about a Haffenden request. In that conversation, McCabe told Lanza that Joe Adonis had visited the Naval Intelligence office on Church Street for a meeting with Haffenden. (Herlands)
1942
Commander C. Radcliffe Haffenden is removed from the B-3 Section of Naval Intelligence and placed in charge of the "Target" Section, responsible for collecting strategic intelligence information about possible Allied invasion sites. (Herlands)
1942 Dec 08
New York County district attorney intercepts a telephone conversation between Joseph Lanza and Willie McCabe, discussing Brooklyn underworld chief Vincent Mangano, who has become part of the Naval Intelligence project. At the time, Haffenden is seeking information about physical aspects of Sicily, and Mangano is believed to be able to assist. (Herlands)
1942 Dec 22
New York County district attorney intercepts a follow-up telephone conversation between Lanza and Haffenden on the Brooklyn waterfront. (Herlands)
1942 Dec 26
New York County district attorney intercepts a telephone conversation between Joseph Lanza and Meyer Lansky. Lansky says he will be right down to see Lanza. (Herlands)
1942 Dec 28
New York County district attorney intercepts a telephone conversation between Joseph Lanza and Meyer Lansky. They discuss an upcoming trip to see Lucania in Great Meadow Prison. Lanza says he is unable to go. (Herlands)
1942 Dec 29
Visit 6. Includes Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky, Michele "Mike" Miranda and one additional unnamed visitor. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)

1943

1943 Jan
Allied leaders meeting in North Africa decide to invade Axis-controlled Sicily. (Herlands)
1943 Feb 01
Motion is made in New York County Supreme Court to modify Lucania's prison sentence. (Herlands)
1943 Feb 08
Justice Philip J. McCook, who originally sentenced Lucania, hears arguments on the motion to modify the sentence. Military authorities, including Commander Haffenden, meet with the judge in his chambers to discuss Lucania's assistance to the U.S. war effort. (Herlands)
1943 Feb 10
Supreme Court Justic Philip J. McCook denies a Lucania sentence reduction motion but notes that Lucania probably was aiding the U.S. war effort. McCook said the assistance would not justify a reduction in sentence, but he noted that, with continued contributions and good behavior from Lucania, executive clemency could become appropriate. McCook had met privately with Commander Haffenden and Lieutenant Colonel Murray Gurfein. (Herlands)
Meyer Lansky

Lansky

1943 Feb 17
Visit 7. Includes Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky and at least one other unnamed visitor. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1943 Feb 24
New York county district attorney discontinues eavesdropping on Lanza headquarters telephone communications. (Herlands)
1943 May 11
Visit 8. Includes Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky and one unnamed visitor. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1943 May 24
The "Target" Section of Naval Intelligence is renamed "F Section." Commander Charles Radcliffe Haffenden is officer-in-charge of the section. (Herlands)
1943 Jul 10
Allied forces begin Operation Husky - invasion of Sicily. (Herlands)
1943 Jul 28
Prison visit by sister Fanny Galasso. (FBI July 1946)
1943 Jul 29
Prison visit by sister Fanny Galasso. (FBI July 1946)
1943 Aug 17
Allied invasion of Sicily is completed. (Herlands)
1943 Sep 25
Prison visit by sister Fanny Galasso and her daughter. (FBI July 1946)
1943 Sep 26
Prison visit by sister Fanny Galasso and her daughter. (FBI July 1946)
1943 Sep 28
Visit 9. Includes Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky and one unnamed visitor. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1943 Oct 11
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (FBI July 1946)
1943 Nov 30
Visit 10. Includes Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky and one unnamed visitor. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)

1944

1944 Jan 11
Visit 11. Includes Meyer Lansky and one unnamed visitor. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1944 Mar 01
Visit 12. Includes two unnamed visitors. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1944 May 16
Visit 13. Includes Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky and one unnamed visitor. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1944 Jun
Commander Haffenden, fifty-two years of age, leaves his Naval Intelligence post and volunteers for duty with Naval Amphibious forces. (Herlands)
1944 Jun 03
Prison visit by sister Fanny Galasso and her husband Michael Galasso. (FBI July 1946)
1944 Jun 04
Prison visit by sister Fanny Galasso and her husband Michael Galasso. (FBI July 1946)
1944 Jun 12
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania and nephew Anthony Lucania. (FBI July 1946)
1944 Jul 12
Visit 14. Includes Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky and two unnamed visitors. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1944 Aug 11
Prison visit by nephew Anthony Lucania, sister Fanny Galasso and her daughter. (FBI July 1946)
1944 Aug 12
Prison visit by nephew Anthony Lucania, sister Fanny Galasso and her daughter. (FBI July 1946)
1944 Sep 10
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania and niece Tilly Lucania. (FBI July 1946)
1944 Sep 19
Visit 15. Includes Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky and two unnamed visitors. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1944 Sep 25
Commander Haffenden reports for training in landing and invasion at Amphibious Training Base, Oceanside, California. (Herlands)
Benjamin Siegel

Siegel

1944 Oct 25
Commander Haffenden is assigned to overseas duty with the Pacific Fleet. (Herlands)
1944 Nov 23
Visit 16. Includes Moses Polakoff, Guarino "Willie Moore" Moretti, Benjamin Siegel and two unnamed visitors. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)

1945

1945 Feb 19
Commander Haffenden participates in the invasion of Iwo Jima. He suffers a concussion when an enemy shell explodes nearby. (Herlands)
1945 Feb 28
Commander Haffenden is evacuated from the beach of Iwo Jima to a hospital ship. (Herlands)
1945 Mar 03
Visit 17. Includes Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky and one unnamed visitor. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1945 Apr 21
Prison visit by sister Fanny Galasso and her daughter. (FBI July 1946)
1945 May 02
Visit 18. Includes Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky and one unnamed visitor. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1945 May 07
German authorities surrender to the Allies. (Herlands)
Dewey

Dewey

1945 May 08
On Victory in Europe Day, through attorney Moses Polakoff, Lucania submits a petition for executive clemency to Governor Thomas E. Dewey. Dewey refers the petition to the Board of Parole for investigation. (Herlands)
1945 May 17
A letter from Commander Haffenden to the New York governor's counsel states that Lucania rendered wartime assistance to the Office of Naval Intelligence. Details of the assistance are not provided. (Herlands)
1945 May 31
Visit 19. Includes Meyer Lansky and one unnamed visitor. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1945 Jun
Lieutenant Colonel Murray Gurfein, serving with the Office of Strategic Services in Paris, executes an affidavit describing the relationship between the Office of Naval Intelligence and Lucania. Office of Naval Intelligence will not permit the affidavit to be released. (Herlands)
1945 Jun 05
Board of Parole, considering the Lucania case, interviews Commander Haffenden by telephone. (Herlands)
1945 Jun 22
Board of Parole again interviews Commander Haffenden. (Herlands)
1945 Jun 23
Board of Parole Chairman Frederick A. Moran interviews Lucania at Great Meadow Prison. (Herlands)
1945 Jun 25
Board of Parole interviews District Attorney Hogan, Moses Polakoff and Commander Murphy. (Herlands)
1945 Jun 26
Board of Parole interviews Lieutenant Commander MacDowell. (Herlands)
1945 Jul
Office of Naval Intelligence begins an investigation of the relationship between Lucania and Commander Haffenden. Later in the month, the Commandant of the Third Naval District requires Haffenden to answer in writing three questions regarding his work with Lucania and his efforts on Lucania's behalf. (FBI March 1946, FBI April 1946)
1945 Jul 15
Prison visit of brother-in-law Michael Galasso and his daughter. (FBI July 1946)
1945 Jul 19
Board of Parole interviews Moses Polakoff and Meyer Lansky. (Herlands)
1945 Jul 25
Commander Haffenden responds to Commandant, Third Naval District, denying that he has used influence on Lucania's behalf and insisting the Lucania provided access to informants beneficial to the U.S. war effort. (FBI March 1946)
1945 Jul 27
Board of Parole interviews Commander Haffenden by telephone.
1945 Aug 18
Board of Parole Chairman Frederick A. Moran interviews Lucania at Great Meadow Prison. (Herlands)
1945 Aug 21
Visit 20. Includes Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky and one unnamed visitor. (Herlands, FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1945 Aug 23
Board of Parole Chairman Frederick A. Moran interviews Joseph Lanza in prison. (Herlands)
1945 Aug 24
Prison visit by sister Fanny Galasso. (FBI July 1946)
1945 Aug 29
Navy's Third District Intelligence Office destroys numerous wartime files on orders from Washington, D.C. The files possibly include records relating to informants. (Herlands)
1945 Aug 30
Prison visit by nephew Anthony Lucania. (FBI July 1946)
1945 Sep 02
Japanese authorities surrender to Allies - V-J Day. (Herlands)
1945 Sep 06
Board of Parole Chairman Frederick A. Moran interviews Corrections Commissioner John A. Lyons regarding Lucania's 1942 prison transfer and the method of arranging and tracking ONI-related visits. (Herlands)
1945 Sep 09
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania. (FBI July 1946)
1945 Nov 20
Visit 21. Includes Meyer Lansky and one unnamed visitor. With the war concluded, this visit could serve no wartime intelligence purpose. (FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1945 Nov 29
Visit 22. Includes Meyer Lansky and one unnamed visitor. With the war concluded, this visit could serve no wartime intelligence purpose. (FBI May 1946, FBI July 1946)
1945 Dec 03
Board of Parole issues a favorable recommendation on a plan to commute the remainder of Lucania's sentence and deport him to Italy. (Herlands)

1946

1946 Jan 01
Newly inaugurated New York City Mayor William O'Dwyer appoints Charles Radcliffe Haffenden to the position of Commissioner of Marine and Aviation. Among other responsibilities, Haffenden is to oversee the construction of Idlewild Airport. (FBI March 1946)
1946 Jan 03
Governor Thomas E. Dewey commutes Lucania's sentence "upon the express condition that the said Charles Luciano be deported forthwith and shall not thereafter re-enter the United States. (Parole, Herlands)

This commutation is granted upon the further express condition that if the said CHARLES LUCIANO shall be hereafter convicted of any felony committed during the period between the date of his discharge by reason hereof and the date of the expiration of the full term hereby commuted, or if he re-enter the United States, he shall be deemed an escaped convict with respect to the said commuted term, and in addition to the penalty which may be imposed for the felony committed during the interval aforesaid he shall be compelled to serve in the prison or penitentiary in which he may be confied for such felony or if not confied therefor in any prison or penitentiary, then in use of the New York State Prisons, the portion of the term hereby commuted remaining unserved without deduction or commutation for good behavior, and on the further express condition that the said inmate shall live and remain at liberty without violating the law and that for the balance of the maximum of the aforesaid term, the said inmate shall remain subject to the supervision, jurisdiction and control of the Board of Parole of the State of New York and subject to all of its rules and regulations in the same manner as a prisoner on parole under the provisions of the Correction Law.

(Additional conditions for the commutation of Lucania's sentence by Governor Thomas E. Dewey, Jan. 3, 1946, attached to report of Division of Parole, Feb. 2, 1946.)

1946 Jan 03
Prison visit by brother Bert Lucania and nephew Anthony Lucania. (FBI July 1946)
 

SING SING STATE PRISON

Sing Sing Prison
1946 Jan 09
Lucania is transferred from Great Meadow Prison to Sing Sing Prison. (FBI July 1946)
1946 Feb 02
Board of Parole grants parole to Lucania, solely for the purpose of having him deported. (Parole, Herlands)
 

ELLIS ISLAND

Ellis Island
1946 Feb 02
Immigration and Naturalization agents take custody of Lucania and bring him from Sing Sing Prison to Ellis Island. Immigration officials allow Lucania to visit with Moses Polakoff, Meyer Lansky, Frank Costello and Mike Lascari. The visitors bring Lucania some clothing. Lucania is permitted to bring $60 in cash and $2,500 in traveler's checks with him as he leaves the country. Lucania gives $400 in extra cash to Costello. (FBI May 1946 B)
1946 Feb 08
Immigration and Naturalization agents place Lucania aboard the S.S. Laura Keene at Pier 7, Bush Terminal, Brooklyn. Six guards are placed on the ship with him. (FBI May 1946 B)
Bush Terminal

Bush Terminal

1946 Feb 09
Lucania is scheduled to depart from New York aboard the S.S. Laura Keene, bound for Italy. (Herlands)
1946 Feb 10
Her departure delayed for a day by bad weather, the S.S. Laura Keene leaves Brooklyn bound for Italy. Two of the Immigration and Naturalization guards remain on the ship while it is in U.S. coastal waters and then return to New York on a launch. (FBI May 1946 B)
1946 Feb 27
The S.S. Laura Keene reaches Naples, Italy. Italian police take Lucania into custody, question him and then send him to Palermo, Sicily. (FBI May 1946 B)
1946 May 17
A memo by Alex Rosen, FBI assistant director in charge of the Investigative Division, notes that Commander Haffenden used his influence to benefit Lucania and was officially censured by the Navy for his actions. The memo outlines the secret use of Lucania as an informant for the Office of Naval Intelligence and the Navy's subsequent investigation. A handwritten note on the memo states: "A shocking example of misuse of Navy authority in interest of a hoodlum. It surprises me they didn't award Luciano the Navy Cross." (Hoover)
1946 May 31
New York City Mayor William O'Dwyer fires Commissioner of Marine and Aviation Haffenden. Rumors indicate that Haffenden was attempting to monopolize concession operations at the under-construction Idlewild Airport. (FBI July 1946)
1946 Jul 02
Report by Federal Bureau of Investigation contains speculation that the Naval Intelligence program aided Luciano in having "unofficial visits with individuals who probably would not have been admitted as visitors under the ordinary rules." Report also criticizes the "extremely careless" handling of visiting records. (FBI July 1946)
 

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